Most of us appear to be plagued by the notion that digits describe a thing (for instance an infant) more accurately than do the qualities the thing possesses (for instance the infant’s drooling smiles, watery eyes, redundant dimples, pathetic coiffure, tiered chins and helpless unignorable outcries). Accuracy is a useful thing, certainly. A skyscraper designed …

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What’s Wrong With Public Intellectuals? – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“If there is a task, it might be to participate in making "the public” more brilliant, more skeptical, more disobedient, more capable of self-defense, and more dangerous again—dangerous to elites, and dangerous to stability; when it comes to education, dangerous to the idea that universities should be for the rich, rather than the public, and …

Continue reading What’s Wrong With Public Intellectuals? – The Chronicle of Higher Education

To the fear of a sudden catastrophe was soon added a growing realization of the negative sides of technological triumphs in general, a realization that was accompanied by totally new questions for philosophy. For example, advances in biology and medicine led to a novel cooperation between philosophers and representatives of the life sciences for the …

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